Nwc Investment And An Annual Ocf The Fixed Asset Is Fully Depreciated Required Return Is 18 Percent The Project S Equivalent Annual Cost

Ross et al.: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, Sixth Edition, Alternate Edition

IV. Capital Budgeting

10. Making Capital Investment Decisions

© The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2002

Basic

(continued )

Intermediate

(Questions 20-24)

PART FOUR Capital Budgeting

17. Calculating EAC A five-year project has an initial fixed asset investment of $225,000, an initial NWC investment of $20,000, and an annual OCF of -$25,000. The fixed asset is fully depreciated over the life of the project and has no salvage value. If the required return is 15 percent, what is this project's equivalent annual cost, or EAC?

18. Calculating EAC You are evaluating two different silicon wafer milling machines. The Techron I costs $195,000, has a three-year life, and has pretax operating costs of $32,000 per year. The Techron II costs $295,000, has a five-year life, and has pretax operating costs of $19,000 per year. For both milling machines, use straight-line depreciation to zero over the project's life and assume a salvage value of $20,000. If your tax rate is 35 percent and your discount rate is 14 percent, compute the EAC for both machines. Which do you prefer? Why?

19. Calculating a Bid Price Guthrie Enterprises needs someone to supply it with 170,000 cartons of machine screws per year to support its manufacturing needs over the next five years, and you've decided to bid on the contract. It will cost you $510,000 to install the equipment necessary to start production; you'll depreciate this cost straight-line to zero over the project's life. You estimate that in five years, this equipment can be salvaged for $40,000. Your fixed production costs will be $160,000 per year, and your variable production costs should be $8 per carton. You also need an initial investment in net working capital of $60,000. If your tax rate is 35 percent and you require a 16 percent return on your investment, what bid price should you submit?

20. Cost-Cutting Proposals Massey Machine Shop is considering a four-year project to improve its production efficiency. Buying a new machine press for $450,000 is estimated to result in $150,000 in annual pretax cost savings. The press falls in the MACRS five-year class, and it will have a salvage value at the end of the project of $90,000. The press also requires an initial investment in spare parts inventory of $18,000, along with an additional $3,000 in inventory for each succeeding year of the project. If the shop's tax rate is 35 percent and its discount rate is 14 percent, should Massey buy and install the machine press?

21. Comparing Mutually Exclusive Projects Pags Industrial Systems Company (PISC) is trying to decide between two different conveyor belt systems. System A costs $405,000, has a three-year life, and requires $105,000 in pretax annual operating costs. System B costs $450,000, has a five-year life, and requires $60,000 in pretax annual operating costs. Both systems are to be depreciated straight-line to zero over their lives and will have zero salvage value. Whichever project is chosen, it will not be replaced when it wears out. If the tax rate is 34 percent and the discount rate is 20 percent, which project should the firm choose?

22. Comparing Mutually Exclusive Projects Suppose in the previous problem that PISC always needs a conveyor belt system; when one wears out, it must be replaced. Which project should the firm choose now?

23. Calculating a Bid Price Consider a project to supply 60 million postage stamps per year to the U.S. Postal Service for the next five years. You have an idle parcel of land available that cost $750,000 five years ago; if the land were sold today, it would net you $900,000. You will need to install $2.4 million in new manufacturing plant and equipment to actually produce the stamps; this plant and equipment will be depreciated straight-line to zero over the project's

Ross et al.: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, Sixth Edition, Alternate Edition

IV. Capital Budgeting

10. Making Capital Investment Decisions

© The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2002

CHAPTER 10 Making Capital Investment Decisions

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