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Ross et al.: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, Sixth Edition, Alternate Edition

III. Valuation of Future Cash Flows

7. Interest Rates and Bond Valuation

© The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2002

PART THREE Valuation of Future Cash Flows

"FRED" data, then "Interest Rates." You will find listings for Moody's Seasoned Aaa Corporate Bond Yield and Moody's Seasoned Baa Corporate Bond Yield. A default premium can be calculated as the difference between the Aaa bond yield and the Baa bond yield. Calculate the default premium using these two bond indices for the most recent 36 months. Is the default premium the same for every month? Why do you think this is?

Ross et al.: Fundamentals I III. Valuation of Future I 8. Stock Valuation I I © The McGraw-Hill of Corporate Finance, Sixth Cash Flows Companies, 2002

Edition, Alternate Edition

Ross et al.: Fundamentals I III. Valuation of Future I 8. Stock Valuation I I © The McGraw-Hill of Corporate Finance, Sixth Cash Flows Companies, 2002

Edition, Alternate Edition

When the stock market closed on July 3, 2001, the common stock of McGraw-Hill, publisher of fine-quality college textbooks, was going for $67.40 per share. On that same day, stock in General Motors (GM), the world's largest automaker, closed at $64.72, while eBay, the on-line auction company, closed at $69.16. Since the stock prices of these three companies were so similar, you might expect that the three companies would be offering similar dividends to their stockholders, but you would be wrong. In fact, GM's annual dividend was $2.00 per share, McGraw-Hill's was $0.98 per share, and eBay was paying no dividends at all!

As we will see in this chapter, the dividends currently being paid are one of the primary factors we look at when attempting to value common stocks. However, it is obvious from looking at eBay that current dividends are not the end of the story, so this chapter explores dividends, stock values, and the connection between the two.

In our previous chapter, we introduced you to bonds and bond valuation. In this chapter, we turn to the other major source of financing for corporations, common and preferred stock. We first describe the cash flows associated with a share of stock and then go on to develop a very famous result, the dividend growth model. From there, we move on to examine various important features of common and preferred stock, focusing on shareholder rights. We close out the chapter with a discussion of how shares of stock are traded and how stock prices and other important information are reported in the financial press.

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