Summary

The relationship between the U.S. dollar and bonds and stocks is an indirect one. The more direct relationship exists between the U.S. dollar and the CRB Index, which in turn impacts on bonds and stocks. The dollar moves in the opposite direction of the CRB Index. A falling dollar, being inflationary, will eventually push the CRB Index higher. A rising dollar, being noninflationary, will eventually push the CRB Index lower. The bullish impact of a rising dollar on bonds and stocks is felt when...

New Dimension in Technical Analysis

One of the most striking lessons of the 1980s is that all markets are interrelated financial and nonfinancial, domestic and international. The U.S. stock market doesn't trade in a vacuum it is heavily influenced by the bond market. Bond prices are very much affected by the direction of commodity markets, which in turn depend on the trend of the U.S. dollar. Overseas markets are also impacted by and in turn have an impact on the U.S. markets. Events of the past decade have made it clear that...

All Markets Are Related

What this means for us as traders and investors is that it is no longer possible to study any financial market in isolation, whether it's the U.S. stock market or gold futures. Stock traders have to watch the bond market. Bond traders have to watch the commodity markets. And everyone has to watch the U.S. dollar. Then there's the Japanese stock market to consider. So who needs intermarket analysis I guess just about everyone since all sectors are influenced in some way, it stands to reason that...